Recent Changes

Sunday, May 21

  1. page CV edited Angela M. Calabrese BartonCurriculum Vitae (Fall 2014) 305 Erickson HallMichigan State University…
    Angela M. Calabrese BartonCurriculum Vitae (Fall 2014)
    305 Erickson HallMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing, MI 48823acb@msu.edu517-432-4876
    Education
    Ph.D. 1995 Curriculum, Teaching and Educational Policy.Michigan State University. Emphases and comprehensive graduate level coursework and research in (1) science education, teacher education, and qualitative research (College of Education); and (2) physical chemistry (College of Natural Sciences).
    B.S. 1990 Chemistry. University of Notre Dame (with honors)
    Professional Appointments
    2009 – Professor of Science Education, Department of Teacher Education, Michigan State University. Tenured.
    2006 – 2009 Associate Professor of Science Education, Department of Teacher Education, Michigan State University. Tenured.
    1999-2001 Associate Professor of Science Education, Center for Science Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, Tenured, Fall 2000.
    1996 - 2006 Associate Professor of Science Education and Director of Science Education Programs, Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology Teachers College, Columbia University, NY, NY, Tenured, 2001. Assistant Professor of Science Education, 1996-1999 [on leave 1999-2001].
    July 1998 Visiting Scholar, Ali Institute of Education, Lahore, Pakistan.
    1995-1996 Assistant Professor of Education, Department of Curriculum and Teaching, School of Education, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, Tenure-track.
    1992-1994 Instructor, Department of Chemistry, Lansing Community College, Lansing, MI.
    1990-1991 Chemist,Diagnostic Enzymes Division, Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA.
    Honors and Awards
    2014 Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Faculty Award, Michigan State University.
    2014 Outstanding Dissertation Award, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, awardee: Daniel Birmingham (co-advised with Prof. Anne-Lise Halvorsen)
    2013 American Education Research Association’s Division B (Curriculum) Award for Outstanding Book of the Year (Tan, E. & Calabrese Barton, A. Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Schools, University of Chicago Press)
    2013 Choice Magazine: CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title Award (Tan, E. & Calabrese Barton, A. Empowering Science and Mathematics Education in Urban Schools, University of Chicago Press)
    2013 – University-Community Senior Fellow, Michigan State University
    2012 Magrath APLU Community Engagement Exemplary Program Award: Green Energy Technology in the City
    2012 Afterschool Innovator Award MetLife Foundation: GET City! (with the Boys and Girls Club of Lansing)
    2012 Michigan State University Outreach Scholarship Community Engagement Award
    2010 American Education Research Association’s Informal Education Special Interest Group, Outstanding Research Award
    2010 Program of the Year: Michigan Council. Green Energy Technologies in the City (a collaborative program with the Boys and Girls Club of Lansing)
    2009 American Education Research Association’s Division G (Social Contexts of Education) Award for Research Leading to Transformations of Social Contexts
    2009 Best Paper of the Year Award for Cultural Studies in Science Education [Tan, E. & Calabrese Barton A. (2008). Unpacking science for all through the lens of identities-in-practice. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 3(1), 43-71]
    2004 American Education Research Association’s Division K (Teaching & Teacher Education) Award for Exemplary Research (Re/thinking Scientific Literacy, w/ W. M. Roth, NY, NY: Psychology Press.)
    2004-2005 Dean’s Fellow for Research in Diversity, Teachers College Columbia University
    2003 American Education Studies Association’s Critics Choice Award (Teaching Science for Social Justice, Teachers College Press, 2003)
    2002 Dean’s Technology Award, Teachers College Columbia University
    2000 Early Career Award, National Association for Research in Science Teaching
    2000 Dean’s Technology Award, College of Education, University of Texas at Austin
    1999 Kappa Delta Pi Research Award (Teaching and Teacher Education), American Education Research Association, Division K
    1998-2003 Career Award,National Science Foundation
    1996-1998 National Academy of Education Spencer Fellow
    1995 Outstanding Dissertation Award, Michigan State University, Department of Teacher Education, College of Education
    Research and Publication
    indicates peer review
    D indicates publications with students
    lead author is listed first unless otherwise noted as equal contribution,
    h-index = 29; h-index according to Google Scholar, updated 9/10/2014)
    Books
    1. *Tan, E. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Teaching Science & Mathematics for Empowerment in Urban Settings. University of Chicago Press. This text won the 2013 AERA Division B Outstanding Book Award, and the 2013 Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title Award.
    2. *Basu, S. J., Calabrese Barton, A., & Tan, E. (2011). Democratic Science Teaching: Building the Expertise to Empower Low-Income Minority Youth in Science: Building the Expertise to Empower Low-income Minority Youth in Science (Vol. 3). Springer.
    3. *Roth, W-M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2004). Rethinking scientific literacy. New York: Psychology Press.
    4. *Calabrese Barton, A. (2003). Teaching science for social justice. New York: Teachers College Press.
    5. *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. D. (Eds.) (2001). Teaching science in diverse settings: Marginalized discourses and classroom practice. New York: Peter Lang.
    6. *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Feminist science education. New York: Teachers College Press.
    7. *Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Identity Research in Science Education: Implications for Integrated Experiences & Best Practices. A paper commissioned by the National Academy of Science Board on Science Education.
    8. *Calabrese Barton, A., Tan, E., & Calabrese Barton, S. (2011). Becoming Community Science Experts in Green Energy Technologies. White paper for NSF sponsored symposium on youth motivation in STEM Careers. September, 2011.
    Commissioned white papers
    Refereed Articles (Research Journals)
    In preparation
    1. *Kang, H., Calabrese Barton, A., Rhee, H. & Tan, E. (in prep.) How Do Middle School Students Become STEM-Minded Persons? Middle School Students’ Participation in Science Activities and Identification with STEM Careers. To be submitted to the American Education Research Journal.
    2. D*Calabrese Barton, A., Tan, E., Birmingham, D. & Sato, T. (in prep.). Becoming Community Engineering Experts. To be submitted to Teachers College Record.
    3. D*Birmingham, D. & Calabrese Barton, A. (in prep.). “But the science we do here matters”: Youth authored cases of consequential learning. To be submitted to Science Education.
    Accepted/Published
    1. *Calabrese Barton, A. & Gutierrez, K.(accepted). Structure and agency in science education. Journal of Research in Science Teaching.
    2. *DBirmingham, D. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2014). Putting on a green carnival: Youth taking educated action on socioscientific issues. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 51(3), 286-314. DOI: 10.1002/tea.21127
    3. *DTan, E., Kang, H. O’Neill, T. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2013). Desiring a career in STEM-related fields: How middle school girls articulate and negotiate between their narrated and embodied identities in considering a STEM trajectory. Journal of Research in Science Teaching,50(10), p.1143-1179. DOI: 10.1002/tea.21123.
    4. *DKissling, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2013). Interdisciplinary Study of the Local Power Plant: Cultivating Ecological Citizens. Social Studies Research and Practice 8(3), 128-142.
    5. *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Berchini, C. (2013). Pathways to Insideness: Teaching Science in Urban Settings. Theory into Practice, 52(1), 21-27. DOI: 10.1080/07351690.2013.743765
    6. Tsurasaki, B., Calabrese Barton, A. & Tan, E. (2013). Boundary objects and powerful science teaching and learning. Science Education, 97(1):1-31.
    7. *DMcLaughlin, D. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2013). Preservice Teachers’ Uptake and Understanding of Funds of Knowledge in Elementary Science. Journal of Science Teacher Education. 24(1):13-36. DOI 10.1007/s10972-012-9284-1.
    8. *DCalabrese Barton, A., Kang, H., Tan, E., O’Neill, T., & Brecklin, C. (2012). Crafting a Future in Science: Tracing Middle School Girls’ Identity Work Over Time and Space. American Education Research Journal, doi: 10.3102/0002831212458142.
    9. *Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Citizen(s’) science. A Response to" The Future of Citizen Science." Democracy and Education 20(2),12.
    10. *Rose, S. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Should Great Lakes City Build a New Power Plant? How Youth Navigate Complex Socioscientific Issues. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 49(5), 541-567.
    11. *DFurman, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Learning to teach science in urban schools by becoming a researcher of one’s own beginning practice. Cultural Studies in Science Education 7(1), 153-174. 33. *Calabrese Barton, A. & Lee, O. (2006). A Call to Action. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 43(9), 875-878.
    34. *Calabrese Barton, A. (2005). Editorial: The Role of Agency in Improving Teaching and Learning Science in Urban Settings. School Science and Mathematics. 105(7), 333-335.
    *DMallya, A., Mensah, F. M., Contento, I. R., Koch, P. A. and Calabrese Barton, A. (2012), Extending science beyond the classroom door: Learning from students' experiences with the Choice, Control and Change (C3) curriculum. J. Res. Sci. Teach., 49: 244–269. doi: 10.1002/tea.21006
    *DLim, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2010). Exploring insideness in urban children’s sense of place. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 30, 328 – 337.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Tan, E.(2010). The new green roof: Activism, Science and Greening the Community. Journal of Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 10(3), 207 – 222.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Tan, E. (2010). We be burnin: Agency, Identity and Learning in a Green Energy Program. Journal of the Learning Sciences. 19(2), 187-229.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Upadhyay, B. (2010). Teaching and learning science for social justice: An Introduction to the special issue. Equity & Excellence in Education, 43(1), 1-5.
    *DContento, I. R., Koch, P. A., Lee, H., & Calabrese-Barton, A. (2010). Adolescents Demonstrate Improvement in Obesity Risk Behaviors after Completion of, Choice, Control & Change, a Curriculum Addressing Personal Agency and Autonomous Motivation. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 110(12), 1830-1839.
    Tan, E. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2010). Transforming science learning and student participation in 6th grade science: A case study of an urban minority classroom. Equity & Excellence in Education, 43(1), 38-55.
    *DBasu, S. J. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2010). A researcher-student-teacher model for democratic science pedagogy: Connections to community, shared authority, and critical science agency. Equity & Excellence in Education 43(1), 72-87.
    *DBasu, S.J., Calabrese Barton, A., Locke, D. & Clairmont, N. (2009). Developing a framework for critical physics agency through case study. Cultural Studies in Science Education, 4(2), 345-371.
    *DRoushias, C., Calabrese Barton, A., & Drake, C. (2009). The design and development of a multimedia case-based environment on parental engagement. Journal of Educational Media International, 46(1), 37-52.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Tan, Ed. (2009). Funds of knowledge, discourses and hybrid space. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 50-73.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Tan, E. & Rivet A. (2008). Creating hybrid spaces for engaging school science among urban middle school girls. American Education Research Journal. 45, 68-103.
    *DTan, E. & Calabrese Barton A. (2007). From peripheral to central, the story of Melanie’s metamorphosis in an urban middle school science class. Science Education 92(4), 567-590.
    *DTan, E. & Calabrese Barton A. (2008). Unpacking science for all through the lens of identities-in-practice. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 3, 43-71.
    *DSaubeli, W. Lee, H., Contento, I., Koch, P., & Calabrese Barton, A. (2008). Enhancing Personal Agency and Competence in Eating and Moving: An Outcome Evaluation of Choice, Control, and Change (C3), an Inquiry-Based Middle School Science Curriculum to Reduce Obesity Risk. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 40 (4) S36-S36.
    *DHagiwara, S. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2007). Culture, food, and language: Perspectives from immigrant mothers in school science. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 2(2), 475-515.
    *DLee, H., Contento, I., Sauberli, W., Koch, P., & Calabrese Barton, A. (2007). Using science education to move middle schoolers toward more healthful food and activity choices: An outcome evaluation of Choice, Control, & Change. //Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior//, 39(4), 96-100.
    *DBasu, S. J. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2007). Urban students’ sustained interest in science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 44(3), 466-489.
    *DFurman, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2006). Voice in an Urban Science Video Project. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 43(7), 667-695.
    *DLim, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2006). Science learning and a sense of place in an urban middle school. Cultural Studies in Science Education 1(1), 107-142.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Vora, P. (2006). Improving urban science education: New roles for teachers, students and researchers [book review]. Science Education, 90(2), 379-381.
    *DPerez, G., Drake, C. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2005). The role of presence in parental engagement in urban science education. American Education Research Journal 42(3), 465-498.
    *DUphadyay, B., Calabrese Barton, A. & Zahur, R. (2005). Teaching science for political and social change. Science Education 89(5), 725-744.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Koch, P., Contento, I., & Hagiwara, S. (2005). From food production to global sustainability: Children’s ideas about the food system. International Journal of Science Education 27(10), 1163-1186.
    *DO’Neill, T. & Calabrese Barton. A. (2005). Student ownership in an urban middle school science video project. School Science and Mathematics, 105(6), 292-302.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Drake, C. Perez, G. & St. Louis. K. (2004). Ecologies of parental engagement in urban education. Educational Researcher, 33(4), 3-12.
    *DZacharia, Z. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2004). Understanding urban children’s beliefs about science. Science Education, 88, 197-222.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (2003). Kobe’s story: Doing science as contested terrain. Qualitative Studies in Education, 16(4), 533-552.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (2002). Urban science education studies: A commitment to equity, social justice and a sense of place. Studies in Science Education, 38, 1-38.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Johnson, V. (2002). Truncating agency: Peer review and participatory research. Research in Science Education, 32, 191-214.
    *DZahur, R. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2002). Science education for empowerment and social change: A case study of an urban teacher educator in Pakistan. International Journal of Science Education, 24(9), 899-917.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. (2002). Urban girls' participation in informal science settings: Playing with identities and borders. Curriculum and Teaching, 16(2), 17-37.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Tobin, K. (2002). Learning about transformative research through others' stories: What does it mean to involve "others" in science education reform? Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 39(2), 110 114.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Tobin, K. (2001). Urban science education: A call to action. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Issues 38(8) 843-847.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. (2001). Homeplace and the Harshworld: A feminist re-reading of science and teaching students in poverty. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 17(4), 131-144.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (2001). Critical ethnography: Science education in urban settings: Seeking new ways of praxis through critical ethnography. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 38(8), 899-918.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & McLaren, P. (2001). Capitalism, critical pedagogy, and urban science education: An interview with Peter McLaren Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(8), 847-859.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Hinden, T., Contento, I., Treadeau, M., Hagiwara, S., & Yang, K. (2001). Underprivileged mothers’ views on science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(6), 688-711.
    *Fusco, D. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2001). Re-presenting student achievement in science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(3), 337-354.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Yang, K. (2000). The culture of power and science education: Learning from Miguel. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 37(8), 871-889.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (2000). Preservice teachers developing ideas of multicultural science education. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 32(6), 797-820.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. (2000). Building inclusive science in classrooms through oral histories. Women's Studies Quarterly, 28(1-2), 271-295.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Darkside (2000). Autobiography in science education: Greater objectivity through local knowledge. Research in Science Education, 30(1), 23-42.
    *DIslas, A., Contento, I.R., Koch, P.D., Hagiwara, S., & Calabrese Barton, A. (2000). Food choice criteria in elementary school age children incorporating ecological concerns. Appetite, 34,125.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1999). Learning to teach a multicultural science education through service learning: A case study. Journal of Teacher Education. 50(4), 303-312.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. D. (1999). Re-examining lived experiences: Gender and radical constructivism. Cybernetics and Human Knowing, 6(1), 47-60.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Margin and center: Intersections of urban, homeless children and a pedagogy of liberation. Theory into Practice, 37(4), 296-305.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Reframing science for all and the politics of poverty. Educational Policy 12(5), 525-541.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Examining the social and scientific roles of invention in science education. Research in Science Education 28, 133-152.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Teaching science with homeless children: Pedagogy, representation and identity. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 34, 379-394.
    *Osborne, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Constructing a liberatory pedagogy in science: Dilemmas and contradictions. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 30, 251-260.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. D. (1998). Editorial: Marginalized discourses and science education. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 34, 339-340.
    *Osborne, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Editorial: Teaching margin or center: The Question of what constitutes liberatory practice in school subjects. Theory Into Practice, 37(4), 254-255.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1997). Liberatory science education: Weaving connections between feminist theory and science education. Journal of Curriculum Inquiry 27(2), 141-164.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. (1995). Teaching "Science for All Americans"? Science education reform and Mexican-American students. The High School Journal 78 (4), 244-252.
    *Creary, X., Hataum, H., Barton, A. C., Aldridge, T. (1992). Solvolytic elimination reactions of tertiary a-CSNMe2-substituted systems. Journal of Organic Chemistry, 57, 1887-1897.
    Refereed Articles (Practitioner Journals)
    *Kissling, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (accepted). Place-Based Education: (Re)Integrating Ecology and Economy. Bank Street Occasional Paper Series.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Birmingham, D., Sato, T., Calabrese Barton, S., & Tan, E. (2013). Youth as Community Science Experts in Green Energy Technologies. After school matters 18, 25-33.
    *DKoch, P., Calabrese Barton, A. & Whittaker, R. (2007). Choice, Control and Change: Using scientific evidence to promote healthful food and activity choice. Science Scope, 31(3), 16-19.
    *Koch, P., Calabrese Barton, A., Contento, I., & Crabtree, M. (2008). Farm to Table and beyond: Helping Students Make Sense of the Global Food System. Science Scope, 31(9), 36-39.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Johnson, V. & Nelson, L. (2000). Middle school partnerships: Adventurous teaming. Middle School Journal, 32(2), 39-44.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1995). Developing students' ideas about chemistry through "Oral Histories." Chemistry & Industry, 2, 60.
    Book Chapters
    Bang, M. Brown, B., Calabrese Barton, A., Rosebery, A., & Warren, B. (accepted). Toward More Equitable Opportunities to Learn: Expanding Relationships Between Students, Teachers, and Science Practices. In Schwarz, C., Passmore, C., & Reiser, B (Eds.). Helping Students Make Sense of the World Using Next Generation Science and Engineering Practices. NSTA Press.
    Calabrese Barton, A. (2014).Taking Educated Action with and in Science. In M. Mueller (Ed.) Eco Justice, Citizenship and Youth Activism. New York City: Springer Press.
    Bautista Guerra, J., Calabrese Barton, A., Tan, E., Kang, H. & Brecklin, C. (2012). Kay’s Coat of Many Colors: Out of school figured worlds and urban girls’ engagement with science. In M. Varelas (Ed). Identity and Science Learning. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Tan. E. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Becoming an expert: Transgressing boundaries for identities in science. In M. Varelas (Ed.). Identities and Science Education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Lim, M., Tan, E. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Science learning as participation with and in a place. In Equity and Diversity issues in Science Education. A publication of the NARST Committee on History and Future of Equity & Diversity Issues in Science Education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Hokayem, H. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2010). From a “Hybrid Discourse” towards “Legitimate Peripheral Participation. In Basu, S., Calabrese Barton, A., & Tan, E. (Eds.). Democratic Science Education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Calabrese Barton, A. & Drake, C. (2011). Collective Cultural Relevancy through Hybrid Communities of Practice (pp. 11-38). In L. Scherff. & K. Spector (Eds.). Culture, Relevance, and Schooling: Exploring Uncommon Ground. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Calabrese Barton, A. & Tan, E. (2009). The Evolution of Da Heat: Making a Case for Scientific and Technology Literacy as Robust Participation. (pp. 329-346). In D. Hodson (Ed.). International Technology Handbook. Amsterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Pow, J., DiTomasso, R., Frink, J. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2009). Cultural practices and disciplinary Learning: Science. (pp. 139-158). Youth-full productions: In N. Ayers (Ed.). Cultural Practices and Constructions of Content and Social Spaces. New York: Peter Lang.
    Calabrese Barton, A. (2009). Mothering and science literacy: Challenging truth-making and authority through counterstory. (pp. 134-145). In W. M. Roth (Ed.) Taking a standpoint. New York: Routledge.
    Calabrese Barton, A. (2008). Feminisms and a World Not Yet: Science with and for Social Justice. In K. Tobin (Ed.) Handbook of Science Education: North America. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Calabrese Barton, A., Rubel, L., Furman, M., and Lopez-Freeman, M. (2009). Preparing science teachers for diverse audiences. Report to the Knowles Foundation: Preparation and support of new science teachers. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Calabrese Barton, A. & O’Neill, T. (2008). Counter-Storytelling in Science: Authoring a Place in the Worlds of Science and Community. In R. Levinson (Ed). Creative Encounters: Science and Art. London: Wellcome Trust.
    Calabrese Barton, A. & Furman, M. (2007). Working on the Margins to Bring Science to the center of Students' Lives: The Development of a School-University Partnership in New York City (pp. 173-187). in S. Ritchie (Ed). Research Collaboration: Relationships and Praxis. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
    Calabrese Barton, A. & Brickhouse, N. (2006). Engaging girls in science. C. Skelton, B. Francis & L. Smulyan. Gender and Education Handbook. London: Sage Publications.
    Calabrese Barton, A. (2006). Science learning in urban science education. S. Abell and N. Lederman (Eds.). Handbook of research in science teaching. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. p. 319-343.
    Rivera, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2005). Where is the joy? Social justice and reform in elementary school science. D. Keiser & N. Michelli (Eds). Reform and social justice. New York: Routledge.
    Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. D. (2002). Science with and for the community. In W. M. Roth (Ed.) Science with and for social action. (pp.167-184). New York: Peter Lang.
    Koch, J. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2000). A meeting of two cultures: The experience of facilitating a teacher enhancement project for Egyptian high school science teachers. In S. Abell (Ed.) International science education. (pp. 157-170). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Press.
    Osborne, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2000). Power, privilege, and the social construction of identity in science class. Girls and feminist science teaching. In K. Cornbleth (Ed.) Curriculum politics, policy and practice: Cases in context (pp. 49-76). New York: SUNY Press.
    Moodley, S. & Calabrese Barton, A. (1999). Urban science education and children in poverty. In M. Alampi & P. Comeau (Eds.) The American education annual 1997-1998: Trends and issues in the educational community (p. 697-709). Detroit: Gale Press.
    Grants & Fellowships
    Under review
    I-Engineering: Tools for Teaching and Learning Engineering Practices: Pathways Towards Productive Identity Development in Engineering. National Science Foundation, Principle Investigator. Edna Tan & Scott Calabrese Barton, co-PI, $1,340,000. 9/2015- 8/2019
    Awarded
    Youth Access & Equity Research & Practice Agenda [a planning grant]- Collaborative proposal to the National Science Foundation and the Wellcome Trust [UK] with Louise Archer (Kings College) and Lynn Dierking (Oregon State University), 1/2015-12/2015.
    Making for Change: Becoming Community Engineering Experts through Makerspaces and Youth Ethnography, National Science Foundation, Principle Investigator. Edna Tan, co-PI. DRL #1421116, $299,999. 9/2014- 8/2016
    InvestigAction: Underrepresented Middle School Youth Becoming Community Engineering Experts, MSU, CREATE 4 STEM. Principle Investigator. Co-PIs: Scott Calabrese Barton, Danny Caballero, & Edna Tan. $100,000. 1/2014-5/2015
    Improving Science Teaching & Learning: Studying How Beginning Elementary Teachers Notice and Respond to Students’ Scientific Sense-making, National Science Foundation, co- Principle Investigator. PI: Christina Schwarz. 9/2013-8/2016, $499,997.
    Making Healthy Food and Activity Choices in GET City, Michigan Fitness Foundation. co- Principle Investigator. PI: Kim Chung, 1/2013-5/2014, $94,482.
    Full-Scale Development: Science STARS-Nurturing urban girls' identities through inquiry-based science University of Rochester/National Science Foundation. Co-Principle Investigator. PI: April Luehmann (University of Rochester), 9/1/2011 – 8/31/2016, $307,982.
    SUPPLEMENTAL: Club 2 School: Rethinking the STEM pipeline, National Science Foundation, HRD #0936692. Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Edna Tan, 9/1/2010 – 8/31/2012, $96,242 (awarded, September 2010)
    Club 2 School: Rethinking the STEM pipeline, National Science Foundation, HRD #0936692, Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Edna Tan, 9/1/2009 – 8/31/2012, $499,995
    Noyce Phase II: Teachers for a New Era, National Science Foundation DUE #833278. Principle Investigator, Co-PI: Gail Richmond, 9/15/2008 – 8/30/2011, $500,000
    Ecologies of Teacher – Parental Engagement: An Investigation into Teacher Learning about Parental Engagement in Science and Mathematics Education, Spencer Foundation. Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Corey Drake, 6/1/2008 – 5/30/2009, $40,000
    Green Energy Technologies in the City, National Science Foundation, Award # 0737642. Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Scott Calabrese Barton & Carmen Turner, 10/1/2007 – 9/30/2011, $899, 995
    Choice, Control and Change: A Middle School Science Curriculum for the Prevention of Overweight Children, National Institutes of Health, Subcontract to Teachers College Columbia University. Co-Principle Investigator. PI: Isobel Contento (Teachers College), 10/1/2007 – 8/1/2008, $27,000
    Urban Middle School Girls’ Science Practices, National Science Foundation, Award #0429109 Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Ann Rivet. [Supplemental funding, awarded June 2008, for $65,567], 7/1/2004 – 8/30/2008 [supplemental through 2/28/09], $499, 334
    SLC Catalyst: Science of Learning in Urban Educating Institutions. Co-Principle Investigator. PI: Roger Anderson. National Science Foundation, Award # 0350288, Oct 1, 2003- Oct 1, 2004, $150,475
    I USE Science! Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation, January 2002 – December 2004, $225,000
    Science Education for Political Empowerment and Social Change, Spencer Foundation. Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Rubina Zahur. (Small Grants Program), March 2000 – March 2001, $35,000
    Science Education Reform and Parents in Urban Poverty: A Relational Systems Approach, National Science Foundation, Award #9980592. Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Margery Osborne & Corey Drake, 2000-2003, $654,000
    Science Education and Economically Disadvantaged Children, National Science Foundation, CAREER Award #0096032. Principle Investigator. 1998-2003, $500,000
    Linking Science Literacy and Nutrition Literacy for Elementary Inner-City Children. Co-Principle Investigator, PI: Isobel Contento, National Institutes of Health, 1997-2004, $688,000 (1997-2000), and $650,000 (2001-2004)
    Science Education and Homeless Children, National Academy of Education Spencer Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, 1996-1998, $40,000
    {CalabreseBarton.CV.April.2017.pdf}
    (view changes)
    8:59 am
  2. page home edited ... Overview The questions that drive my work include: What is “equitably consequential” teaching…
    ...
    Overview
    The questions that drive my work include: What is “equitably consequential” teaching and learning (in STEM, and other disciplines) for youth from historically marginalized communities -- What forms does it take? What are its outcomes? How does it impact youth’s individual and collective development? What tools and practices might best support teachers in imagining and enacting such teaching, and in what ways? I purposefully use the phrase, equitably consequential, to call attention to the importance of recognizing teaching and learning science (or any domain) as an historicized experience and practice, with outcomes that expand disciplinary learning/engagement to also include critical agency and social transformation.
    ...
    and learning.
    In

    In
    particular, there
    ...
    and justice.
    I

    I
    have approached
    ...
    related perspectives:
    Multi-sited longitudinal ethnographic case studies of youth learning/engagement in science across settings
    Youth participatory design-based research towards the design of learning environments
    ...
    Making for Change: Becoming Community Engineering Experts through Makerspaces and Youth Ethnography, National Science Foundation. DRL #1421116.
    The Makerspace Movement: Sites of Possibilities for Promoting Equitable Opportunities to Learn and Pursue STEM among Underrepresented Youth. William T. Grant Foundation Distinguished Fellows Program
    ...
    - Collaborative proposal toproject with the National
    (view changes)
    8:36 am
  3. page home edited ... Professor, Department of Teacher Education acb@ msu.edu CV {CalabreseBarton.CV.April.2017.…
    ...
    Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    acb@ msu.edu
    CV{CalabreseBarton.CV.April.2017.pdf}
    Come visit my research lab website:
    Invincibility Lab @ MSU: http://invincibility.us
    Overview
    My research addresses a core issue in scienceThe questions that drive my work include: What is “equitably consequential” teaching and engineering education: Achievementlearning (in STEM, and interest gaps remain in the sciences and engineeringother disciplines) for studentsyouth from underrepresented backgrounds. For example,historically marginalized communities -- What forms does it take? What are its outcomes? How does it impact youth’s individual and collective development? What tools and practices might best support teachers in the United States, African Americans make up only 5% of the engineering workforce, with a majority holding technician rather than leadership positions. This statistic has changed littleimagining and enacting such teaching, and in what ways? I purposefully use the past two decades despite reform efforts. My research connects this persistent large-scale problem withphrase, equitably consequential, to call attention to the experiencesimportance of recognizing teaching and opportunities of young people. In particular, I address two pressing challenges faced by youth from underrepresented backgrounds: 1) opportunities to learnlearning science (or any domain) as an historicized experience and engineering meaningfully, andpractice, with outcomes that expand disciplinary learning/engagement to applyalso include critical agency and social transformation.
    I have been unpicking
    these understandings(and related) questions from multiple standpoints/perspectives: both student- and teacher-centered perspectives through ethnographic and design-based research, in formal and formal settings, and in-the-moment and over time. Cutting across these efforts are deep attention to solving real world problems (“learning”),theory and 2)participatory methodologies aimed at transforming the desire/ability to see oneself as an important, contributing producereducational and consumersocial circumstances of sciencestudents and engineering (“identity”).
    The goal
    their teachers in historically marginalized communities as a means of promoting social equity and learning.
    In particular, there are three related directions that capture the broad connections
    of my scholarship is to help to break the culturalwork with teaching and institutional barriers to scienceteacher education, and engineering success by building equitable and empowering learning environmentswhich illustrate the ways in science and engineering. These environments must address bothwhich I imagine my work moving forward over the learning problem—they must help young people masternext several years: 1) Working within the knowledge and practicesintersection of science—and the identity problem—they must help young people to recognize that they belongformal/informal education in sciencesupport of understanding and engineering. My research examines how and why youth engage indesigning new possibilities for more equitably consequential teaching and teacher learning; 2) designing teaching learning in sciencetools and experiences that promote more expansive learning outcomes, such as critical agency, identity work, and engineering with/through social action in everyday life,transformation (as grounded within expanding disciplinary expertise); and 3) designing and how knowledge of these youth-led endeavors might informleveraging new practicesmethodologies for in-school and after-school instructional settings. These settings allow peopleembracing authentic “research + practice” work that attends to a) be recognized as competent participants in valuedpractitioner and dynamic networks of practice,youth voice, and b) developcritically engages the agency they need to accomplish goals that matter to them. This view of learning scienceequity and engineering pays particular attention to power dynamics, how actors are positioned (and by whom), and the cultural repertoires of practices that actors bring to the process.justice.
    I have approached this work from three related perspectives:
    Multi-sited longitudinal ethnographic case studies of youth learning/engagement in science across settings
    (view changes)
    8:34 am

Friday, December 9

  1. page home edited ... Professor, Department of Teacher Education acb@ msu.edu CV {CalabreseBarton.CV.2016.pdf} …
    ...
    Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    acb@ msu.edu
    CV {CalabreseBarton.CV.2016.pdf}
    Come visit my research lab website:
    Invincibility Lab @ MSU: http://invincibility.us
    (view changes)
    4:33 am

Sunday, January 24

  1. page home edited ... Professor, Department of Teacher Education acb@ msu.edu CV {CalabreseBarton.CV.2016.pdf} …
    ...
    Professor, Department of Teacher Education
    acb@ msu.edu
    CV {CalabreseBarton.CV.2016.pdf}
    Come visit my research lab website:
    Invincibility Lab @ MSU: http://invincibility.us
    Overview

    My research addresses a core issue in science and engineering education: Achievement and interest gaps remain in the sciences and engineering for students from underrepresented backgrounds. For example, in the United States, African Americans make up only 5% of the engineering workforce, with a majority holding technician rather than leadership positions. This statistic has changed little in the past two decades despite reform efforts. My research connects this persistent large-scale problem with the experiences and opportunities of young people. In particular, I address two pressing challenges faced by youth from underrepresented backgrounds: 1) opportunities to learn science and engineering meaningfully, and to apply these understandings to solving real world problems (“learning”), and 2) the desire/ability to see oneself as an important, contributing producer and consumer of science and engineering (“identity”).
    The goal of my scholarship is to help to break the cultural and institutional barriers to science and engineering success by building equitable and empowering learning environments in science and engineering. These environments must address both the learning problem—they must help young people master the knowledge and practices of science—and the identity problem—they must help young people to recognize that they belong in science and engineering. My research examines how and why youth engage in consequential learning in science and engineering with/through social action in everyday life, and how knowledge of these youth-led endeavors might inform new practices for in-school and after-school instructional settings. These settings allow people to a) be recognized as competent participants in valued and dynamic networks of practice, and b) develop the agency they need to accomplish goals that matter to them. This view of learning science and engineering pays particular attention to power dynamics, how actors are positioned (and by whom), and the cultural repertoires of practices that actors bring to the process.
    ...
    Youth participatory design-based research towards the design of learning environments
    Teacher learning/teacher practice in support of consequential learning.
    InvincibilityCurrent Projects Include
    Tools for Teaching and Learning Engineering Practices: Pathways Towards Productive Identity Development in Engineering [I-Engineering]. National Science Foundation. DRL #1502755.
    Making for Change: Becoming Community Engineering Experts through Makerspaces and Youth Ethnography, National Science Foundation. DRL #1421116.
    The Makerspace Movement: Sites of Possibilities for Promoting Equitable Opportunities to Learn and Pursue STEM among Underrepresented Youth. William T. Grant Foundation Distinguished Fellows Program
    Youth Access & Equity
    Research Team Website: http://invincibility.us& Practice Agenda - Collaborative proposal to the National Science Foundation and the Wellcome Trust [UK].

    (view changes)
    4:14 am

Sunday, February 15

  1. page home edited ... CV My research addresses a core issue in science and engineering education: Achievement and i…
    ...
    CV
    My research addresses a core issue in science and engineering education: Achievement and interest gaps remain in the sciences and engineering for students from underrepresented backgrounds. For example, in the United States, African Americans make up only 5% of the engineering workforce, with a majority holding technician rather than leadership positions. This statistic has changed little in the past two decades despite reform efforts. My research connects this persistent large-scale problem with the experiences and opportunities of young people. In particular, I address two pressing challenges faced by youth from underrepresented backgrounds: 1) opportunities to learn science and engineering meaningfully, and to apply these understandings to solving real world problems (“learning”), and 2) the desire/ability to see oneself as an important, contributing producer and consumer of science and engineering (“identity”).
    ...
    the process.
    I have approached this work from three related perspectives:
    Multi-sited longitudinal ethnographic case studies of youth learning/engagement in science across settings
    (view changes)
    11:37 am
  2. page home edited ... Multi-sited longitudinal ethnographic case studies of youth learning/engagement in science acr…
    ...
    Multi-sited longitudinal ethnographic case studies of youth learning/engagement in science across settings
    Youth participatory design-based research towards the design of learning environments
    ...
    consequential learning.

    Invincibility Research Team Website: http://invincibility.us

    (view changes)
    11:37 am

Wednesday, January 14

  1. page CV edited Angela Angela M. Calabrese Barton Curriculum BartonCurriculum Vitae (Fall ... 305 Ericks…

    Angela
    Angela M. Calabrese Barton
    Curriculum
    BartonCurriculum Vitae (Fall
    ...

    305 Erickson Hall
    Michigan
    HallMichigan State University
    East
    UniversityEast Lansing, MI 48823
    acb@msu.edu
    517-432-4876
    48823acb@msu.edu517-432-4876
    Education
    Ph.D. 1995 Curriculum, Teaching and Educational Policy.Michigan State University. Emphases and comprehensive graduate level coursework and research in (1) science education, teacher education, and qualitative research (College of Education); and (2) physical chemistry (College of Natural Sciences).
    ...
    2009 – Professor of Science Education, Department of Teacher Education, Michigan State University. Tenured.
    2006 – 2009 Associate Professor of Science Education, Department of Teacher Education, Michigan State University. Tenured.
    1999-2001 AssociateAssociate Professor of
    1996 - 2006 Associate Professor of Science Education and Director of Science Education Programs, Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology Teachers College, Columbia University, NY, NY, Tenured, 2001. Assistant Professor of Science Education, 1996-1999 [on leave 1999-2001].
    July 1998 Visiting Scholar, Ali Institute of Education, Lahore, Pakistan.
    ...
    1. *Tan, E. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Teaching Science & Mathematics for Empowerment in Urban Settings. University of Chicago Press. This text won the 2013 AERA Division B Outstanding Book Award, and the 2013 Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title Award.
    2. *Basu, S. J., Calabrese Barton, A., & Tan, E. (2011). Democratic Science Teaching: Building the Expertise to Empower Low-Income Minority Youth in Science: Building the Expertise to Empower Low-income Minority Youth in Science (Vol. 3). Springer.
    ...
    Psychology Press.
    4.

    4.
    *Calabrese Barton,
    ...
    College Press.
    5. *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. D. (Eds.) (2001). Teaching science in diverse settings: Marginalized discourses and classroom practice. New York: Peter Lang.
    ...
    College Press.
    1.

    7.
    *Calabrese Barton,
    ...
    Science Education.
    2.

    8.
    *Calabrese Barton,
    Commissioned white papers
    Refereed Articles (Research Journals)
    ...
    4. *DKissling, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2013). Interdisciplinary Study of the Local Power Plant: Cultivating Ecological Citizens. Social Studies Research and Practice 8(3), 128-142.
    5. *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Berchini, C. (2013). Pathways to Insideness: Teaching Science in Urban Settings. Theory into Practice, 52(1), 21-27. DOI: 10.1080/07351690.2013.743765
    ...
    Education, 97(1):1-31.
    7.

    7.
    *DMcLaughlin, D.
    ...
    DOI 10.1007/s10972-012-9284-1.
    8.

    8.
    *DCalabrese Barton,
    ...
    doi: 10.3102/0002831212458142.
    9. *Calabrese Barton, A. (2012). Citizen(s’) science. A Response to" The Future of Citizen Science." Democracy and Education 20(2),12.
    ...
    49(5), 541-567.
    11.

    11.
    *DFurman, M.
    ...
    7(1), 153-174.
    33.
    33. *Calabrese Barton,
    ...
    105(7), 333-335.
    *DMallya,

    *DMallya,
    A., Mensah,
    ...
    doi: 10.1002/tea.21006
    *DLim,

    *DLim,
    M. &
    ...
    – 337.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    – 222.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    19(2), 187-229.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Upadhyay, B. (2010). Teaching and learning science for social justice: An Introduction to the special issue. Equity & Excellence in Education, 43(1), 1-5.
    *DContento, I. R., Koch, P. A., Lee, H., & Calabrese-Barton, A. (2010). Adolescents Demonstrate Improvement in Obesity Risk Behaviors after Completion of, Choice, Control & Change, a Curriculum Addressing Personal Agency and Autonomous Motivation. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 110(12), 1830-1839.
    ...
    43(1), 38-55.
    *DBasu,

    *DBasu,
    S. J.
    ...
    43(1), 72-87.
    *DBasu,

    *DBasu,
    S.J., Calabrese
    ...
    4(2), 345-371.
    *DRoushias,

    *DRoushias,
    C., Calabrese
    ...
    46(1), 37-52.
    *DCalabrese

    *DCalabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    46(1), 50-73.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Tan, E. & Rivet A. (2008). Creating hybrid spaces for engaging school science among urban middle school girls. American Education Research Journal. 45, 68-103.
    ...
    92(4), 567-590.
    *DTan,

    *DTan,
    E. &
    ...
    3, 43-71.
    *DSaubeli, W. Lee, H., Contento, I., Koch, P., & Calabrese Barton, A. (2008). Enhancing Personal Agency and Competence in Eating and Moving: An Outcome Evaluation of Choice, Control, and Change (C3), an Inquiry-Based Middle School Science Curriculum to Reduce Obesity Risk. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 40 (4) S36-S36.
    *DHagiwara, S. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2007). Culture, food, and language: Perspectives from immigrant mothers in school science. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 2(2), 475-515.
    ...
    *DLim, M. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2006). Science learning and a sense of place in an urban middle school. Cultural Studies in Science Education 1(1), 107-142.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Vora, P. (2006). Improving urban science education: New roles for teachers, students and researchers [book review]. Science Education, 90(2), 379-381.
    ...
    42(3), 465-498.
    *DUphadyay,

    *DUphadyay,
    B., Calabrese
    ...
    89(5), 725-744.
    *DCalabrese

    *DCalabrese
    Barton, A.,
    ...
    27(10), 1163-1186.
    *DO’Neill, T. & Calabrese Barton. A. (2005). Student ownership in an urban middle school science video project. School Science and Mathematics, 105(6), 292-302.
    ...
    33(4), 3-12.
    *DZacharia,

    *DZacharia,
    Z. &
    ...
    88, 197-222.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    16(4), 533-552.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    38, 1-38.
    *DCalabrese

    *DCalabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    32, 191-214.
    *DZahur,

    *DZahur,
    R. &
    ...
    24(9), 899-917.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. (2002). Urban girls' participation in informal science settings: Playing with identities and borders. Curriculum and Teaching, 16(2), 17-37.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Tobin, K. (2002). Learning about transformative research through others' stories: What does it mean to involve "others" in science education reform? Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 39(2), 110 114.
    ...
    38(8) 843-847.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    17(4), 131-144.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    38(8), 899-918.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & McLaren, P. (2001). Capitalism, critical pedagogy, and urban science education: An interview with Peter McLaren Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(8), 847-859.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A., Hinden, T., Contento, I., Treadeau, M., Hagiwara, S., & Yang, K. (2001). Underprivileged mothers’ views on science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(6), 688-711.
    *Fusco, D. & Calabrese Barton, A. (2001). Re-presenting student achievement in science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(3), 337-354.
    *DCalabrese Barton, A. & Yang, K. (2000). The culture of power and science education: Learning from Miguel. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 37(8), 871-889.
    ...
    32(6), 797-820.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. (2000). Building inclusive science in classrooms through oral histories. Women's Studies Quarterly, 28(1-2), 271-295.
    ...
    30(1), 23-42.
    *DIslas, A., Contento, I.R., Koch, P.D., Hagiwara, S., & Calabrese Barton, A. (2000). Food choice criteria in elementary school age children incorporating ecological concerns. Appetite, 34,125.
    ...
    50(4), 303-312.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    6(1), 47-60.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Margin and center: Intersections of urban, homeless children and a pedagogy of liberation. Theory into Practice, 37(4), 296-305.
    ...
    12(5), 525-541.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Examining the social and scientific roles of invention in science education. Research in Science Education 28, 133-152.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1998). Teaching science with homeless children: Pedagogy, representation and identity. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 34, 379-394.
    ...
    30, 251-260.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    34, 339-340.
    *Osborne,

    *Osborne,
    M. &
    ...
    37(4), 254-255.
    *Calabrese

    *Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    27(2), 141-164.
    *Calabrese Barton, A. & Osborne, M. (1995). Teaching "Science for All Americans"? Science education reform and Mexican-American students. The High School Journal 78 (4), 244-252.
    *Creary, X., Hataum, H., Barton, A. C., Aldridge, T. (1992). Solvolytic elimination reactions of tertiary a-CSNMe2-substituted systems. Journal of Organic Chemistry, 57, 1887-1897.
    Refereed Articles (Practitioner Journals)
    1. *Kissling,*Kissling, M. &
    ...
    Paper Series.
    2. *DCalabrese

    *DCalabrese
    Barton, A.,
    *DKoch, P., Calabrese Barton, A. & Whittaker, R. (2007). Choice, Control and Change: Using scientific evidence to promote healthful food and activity choice. Science Scope, 31(3), 16-19.
    *Koch, P., Calabrese Barton, A., Contento, I., & Crabtree, M. (2008). Farm to Table and beyond: Helping Students Make Sense of the Global Food System. Science Scope, 31(9), 36-39.
    ...
    *Calabrese Barton, A. (1995). Developing students' ideas about chemistry through "Oral Histories." Chemistry & Industry, 2, 60.
    Book Chapters
    1. Bang,Bang, M. Brown,
    ...
    NSTA Press.
    2. Calabrese

    Calabrese
    Barton, A.
    ...
    Springer Press.
    3. Bautista

    Bautista
    Guerra, J.,
    ...
    Sense Publishers.
    4. Tan.

    Tan.
    E. &
    ...
    Sense Publishers.
    5. Lim,

    Lim,
    M., Tan,
    ...
    Sense Publishers.
    6. Hokayem,

    Hokayem,
    H. &
    Calabrese Barton, A. & Drake, C. (2011). Collective Cultural Relevancy through Hybrid Communities of Practice (pp. 11-38). In L. Scherff. & K. Spector (Eds.). Culture, Relevance, and Schooling: Exploring Uncommon Ground. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Calabrese Barton, A. & Tan, E. (2009). The Evolution of Da Heat: Making a Case for Scientific and Technology Literacy as Robust Participation. (pp. 329-346). In D. Hodson (Ed.). International Technology Handbook. Amsterdam: Sense Publishers.
    ...
    Green Energy Technologies in the City, National Science Foundation, Award # 0737642. Principle Investigator. Co-PI: Scott Calabrese Barton & Carmen Turner, 10/1/2007 – 9/30/2011, $899, 995
    Choice, Control and Change: A Middle School Science Curriculum for the Prevention of Overweight Children, National Institutes of Health, Subcontract to Teachers College Columbia University. Co-Principle Investigator. PI: Isobel Contento (Teachers College), 10/1/2007 – 8/1/2008, $27,000
    ...
    $499, 334
    Improving Urban Science Education in New York City, Hearst Foundation. Principle Investigator.May 2005 – May 2006, $200,000
    Urban Students Practices of Science in Differing Urban Communities, Spencer Foundation Principle Investigator. January 2004 – December 2004, $35,000

    SLC Catalyst: Science of Learning in Urban Educating Institutions. Co-Principle Investigator. PI: Roger Anderson. National Science Foundation, Award # 0350288, Oct 1, 2003- Oct 1, 2004, $150,475
    I USE Science! Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation, January 2002 – December 2004, $225,000
    (view changes)
    11:19 am

More

Copyright © College of Education Michigan State University , East Lansing, MI 48824